Why study this course

Get hands on - it’s not just an academic course. You’ll participate in fieldwork and gains skills in excavation, survey, processing and analysis of finds.

This course will help you develop into a highly employable graduate. Professional archaeologists are currently in incredibly high demand both regionally and nationwide.

BGU has an institutional specialism and focus on social and cultural history, making this different from most history degree courses.

What better place to study history than historic Lincoln? You will have thousands of years of history on your doorstep, ranging from Roman to Victorian, medieval to wartime and beyond.

Course summary

Studying Archaeology is ideal if you’re fascinated by both the ancient and more recent past and if you want to explore and investigate the material remains of previous societies and cultures. It will allow you to get hands-on with the past and explore civilisations and people from throughout history, in a practical and interesting way.

While studying History at BGU, you will explore a range of fascinating topics spanning a number of historical eras, in a variety of local, national and global contexts; from pirates in the early modern Atlantic World to civil rights campaigners in the 1960s. As well as learning about the people in the past, you will investigate how people today engage with history and consider how the past can be brought alive.

Key facts


Award

BA (Hons)

UCAS code

V758

Duration

3 years

Mode of study

Full-time

Start date

September

Awarding institution

Bishop Grosseteste University

Institution code

B38

Course details

About this course


Archaeology

Lincoln is the perfect city in which to study Archaeology. With a 2,000 year history, from Roman foundations to industrial renaissance, you’ll be in the ideal position to discover both ancient and modern here at BGU. So, are you ready to take an amazing journey into the physical reality of the past? Do you have an urge to explore and investigate material remains? Do you want the chance to get hands-on with history? We thought so...

Throughout the course, you will have the chance to study material from prehistory through to Roman and Medieval times as well as exploring contemporary archaeology. In addition to studying archaeological evidence from these different periods, you will also explore key ideas and current issues, such as archaeological method and theory, landscape archaeology and community archaeology.

Not only will you gain the practical skills to undertake archaeological fieldwork, including excavation, surveying, and post-excavation studies, you’ll also strengthen key transferable skills, such as analysing data, assessing evidence, presenting your views and constructing arguments using critical reasoning.

Employability is important to us at BGU, and as part of the course you will have the chance to take a work-based placement at a relevant commercial unit, heritage practice or museum, as well as the exciting opportunity to join the annual BGU training and research excavation – where you can put into practice your newly developed skills.

History

History is essential in understanding what the past means for us in the twenty-first century. Here at BGU, you won’t just study history through documents, you’ll learn through placements, site visits and the archives and museums that the ancient city of Lincoln has to offer. Discover the ages in a dynamic and exciting way; through words, images, buildings and artefacts.

Throughout the course, you will discover a number of the modules which take a more thematic approach where you may explore critical issues such as community and public history, local history or war and commemoration. During your final year, with advice and guidance from academic staff, you will also choose to focus on a topic, period or theme that is of particular interest to you. This allows you to tailor the course to your own interests and particular career aspirations.

On this course, you will explore a range of fascinating topics spanning a number of historical eras, in a wide variety of local, national and global contexts. You’ll analyse data, construct arguments and engage in real historical research, along with looking at how history is encountered within the community. You'll also take a work-based placement at an archive, museum or other historic sites.

This course will help to build your skills as a historian, from introductory subjects in your first year through to a research-based dissertation in your final year. As well as learning about people in the past, you will investigate how people today engage with history and consider how the past can be brought alive.

History Course Booklet

Welcome letter to all new students

What will you study

During the course of your undergraduate, you’ll cover the following modules:

This module will allow you to consider key areas of theory and practice, such as: The origins and character of archaeology as an academic discipline, the approaches taken to data gathering and analysis by archaeologists, and the relationship between theory and interpretation. You will be introduced to a number of core practical skills required of archaeologists in both field and laboratory settings.

This module will investigate evidence for social, economic and cultural life, and will include the study of significant sites, themes and events, associated with the period. You will typically cover topics such as prehistoric social structures and economy, prehistoric and Roman funerary practices, military aspects of the Roman conquest and the end of imperial rule in Britain.

This module serves as an introduction to the subject of history, offering a snapshot of some of the themes covered in subsequent modules. You will consider key areas of theory and practice in history, such as the significance of different schools of historical thought, key source types and popular interpretative approaches.

The module will consider various political, social, cultural and economic perspectives of a transitional and turbulent period of English history. You will consider important social structures and lifecycles, the nature of kingship, the role of the church, challenges to and the decline of feudalism, medieval warfare, and the development of towns as centres of learning and trade.

You will study the chronological development of early modern Britain from Henry VIII to the English Civil Wars. The module will explicitly examine reformation and religious change, the rise of parliament and the state, radical politics and revolutionary change, the impact of print culture, the English Civil War, and the role played by towns, and especially London, as drivers of economic, social and cultural change.

You will study aspects of the archaeology of medieval Europe, and through comparative study understand Britain’s archaeology within this context. You will investigate the evidence for European political and social structures, economic and cultural networks, and include the study of the archaeological evidence for everyday life and the rituals of death.

In this module, you will study the inter-relationship between the contemporary world and the archaeological evidence for the past, including aspects of the identification, recording, management and interpretation of archaeology in both national and international contexts. This includes a consideration of archaeological project management and, more specifically, investigative/excavation strategy and decision making.

You will study and experience aspects of the identification, recording, excavation and post-excavation of archaeological evidence through a live excavation project. You will gain a thorough practical knowledge of the methods and techniques used by archaeologists to survey, record and excavate archaeological features.

The module will explore the evolution of modern British espionage throughout the twentieth century. It will include a critical discussion of the historiographical issues related to the study of intelligence history, focusing on a number of case studies drawn from: Britain’s culture of secrecy, the 1911 Official Secrets Act, the growth of MI5 and MI6, the Abdication Crisis of 1936, Ultra, the Cambridge Five, The Profumo Affair, the role of omen, international relations, and the popular culture of espionage.

This module will develop your knowledge, understanding and subject-specific skills related to local and regional history. A significant focus of the module will be the exploration of the variety of sources available to the historian investigating local history. These will include visual, oral and textual, tangible and intangible, official and private. This activity is normally facilitated by field visits to archives and other sites, and by engaging in the critical use of digital repositories.

You will embark on a voyage of discovery into the Atlantic World of the 17th and 18th centuries. Through a critical review of cutting edge historiographical debates and a variety of primary source material students will analyse the history of the Atlantic World, with a particular focus on the English-speaking colonies of the Caribbean and North America. This module will provide an opportunity to examine a range of key themes from the trans-Atlantic slave trade, pirates in the Caribbean and European state rivalry, to the revolutionary change in social, cultural and religious identities as a result of the Atlantic experience.

This module provides a critical approach to the study of archaeological artefacts from both an applied and theoretical perspective. You will make use of a variety of artefacts and assemblages, both excavated finds and from reference collections, to engage in laboratory-based processes of analysis and conservation.

This independent study project module is an opportunity for you to explore selected themes and issues in the thinking and practice in archaeology. Initial discussion and advice will help you in the selection of an archaeological theme or topic for your study.

During this module you will undertake a wide-ranging critical study of the disciplinary area of conflict archaeology, with specific case studies taken from a number of differing chronological and geographical contexts. Consideration will be given to the methodologies of practice, analysis and interpretation that characterise this archaeological sub-discipline, from fieldwork through standing building recording, to critical artefact studies.

This module requires you to devise and undertake a substantial research-based dissertation on a subject of interest to yourself, and to prepare in written form an abstract and working bibliography. You will conduct your research through self-formulated questions, supported by the acquisition of appropriate archaeological data and construct complex and sophisticated arguments to support the premise of your research question.

The focus of this module is the global and expansionist nature of British Empire between the American Revolution and the First World War. Students will examine the impact of British power, money and culture on indigenous peoples and societies with whom they came into contact and who responded with a mixture of adaptation, co-operation and resistance. In turn, you will examine the ways in which British society and culture were transformed by the imperial experience. You will be expected to engage in historiographical debates about the nature of the British Empire, its origins, purpose, meaning and legacies.

In this module, students are required to undertake a historical research project, drawing on academic advice as well as their own interests and intellectual skills, to produce a research-based written assignment. Students conduct their research by addressing self-formulated questions, supported by the critical selection, evaluation and analysis of primary and secondary source material as appropriate. By these means they devise and sustain a core argument, and/or solve relevant historical problems, to support the premise of their research question. The relatively modest guiding role of the supervisor means that students will be empowered to develop their intellectual and transferable skills of initiative and responsibility.

During this module, you will undertake a wide-ranging critical study of the political, social and cultural chronology of the Cold War from a number of differing geo-political perspectives including that of Great Britain and other European nations as well as the USA and USSR. The module will give significant focus to the conquest of space as a specific element of both Cold War politics and later 20th century social, technological and cultural change.

Entry requirements

You will normally need 96-112 UCAS tariff points (from a maximum of four Advanced Level qualifications). We welcome a range of qualifications that meet this requirement, such as A/AS Levels, BTEC, Access Courses, International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge Pre-U, Extended Project etc.

However this list is not exhaustive – please click here for details of all qualifications in the UCAS tariff.

Further information

Click here for important information about this course including additional costs, resources and key policies.

In accordance with University conditions, students are entitled to apply for Accredited Prior Learning, AP(C)L, based on relevant credit at another HE institution or credit Awarded for Experiential Learning, (AP(E)L).

How you will be taught

There is no one-size-fits-all method of teaching at BGU – we shape our methods to suit each subject and each group, combining the best aspects of traditional university teaching with innovative techniques to promote student participation and interactivity.

You will be taught in a variety of ways, from lectures, tutorials and seminars, to practical workshops, coursework and work-based placements. Small group seminars and workshops will provide you with an opportunity to review issues raised in lectures, and you will be expected to carry out independent study.

Placements are a key part of degree study at BGU. They provide an enriching learning experience for you to apply the skills and knowledge you will gain from your course and, in doing so, give valuable real-world experience to boost your career.

Assessment

Archaeology

In Archaeology, assessment is carried out using wide-range of approaches, including written assignments, coursework, essays and reports. There are a few exams throughout the course but these often include analysis of provided source material, either text or images. You will also carry out a small number of oral presentations, produce portfolios of research material, and undertake some practical assessments.

History

In History, a variety of assessment methods are used, which include essays, reports, presentations and written tests. We support you in this work through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical workshops and a wide range of field visits. History is primarily a written subject and consequently, much of the assessment of the course is based on essays and reports. There are a few exams, which often include analysis of provided source material, either text or images. There are also a smaller number of oral presentations and the production of portfolios of research material.

Careers & Further study

Archaeology

As well as learning a number of highly practical skills, Archaeology also teaches you how to assemble and assess evidence, analyse data and present and defend your views – all of which are highly sought-after by employers upon graduation. Possible future careers for Archaeology graduates may include Commercial Archaeologist, Heritage Consultant, Archivist, Researcher, Museum education and outreach, or Editorial work or journalism.

History

The study of history teaches you how to assemble and assess evidence from a wide range of sources – archival and digital, textual and visual. It teaches transferable skills in the analysis of data and the robust construction of arguments using critical thinking rooted in evidence. Possible future careers for History graduates include education in the schooling and heritage sectors, journalism and publishing, law and policing, public policy, information research and management, working as an archivist, librarian or museum curator. History is a highly respected qualification amongst the Top 100 Graduate employers in the finance, commercial, legal and logistics sectors. Successful graduates of this course have also continued to study for Masters degrees at BGU.

Support

Studying at BGU is a student-centred experience. Staff and students work together in a friendly and supportive atmosphere as part of an intimate campus community. You will know every member of staff personally and feel confident approaching them for help and advice, and staff members will recognise you, not just by sight, but as an individual with unique talents and interests.

We will be there to support you, personally and academically, from induction to graduation.

Fees & Finance

A lot of student finance information is available from numerous sources, but it is sometimes confusing and contradictory. That’s why at BGU we try to give you all the information and support we can to help to throughout the process. Our Student Advice team are experts in helping you sort out the funding arrangements for your studies, offering a range of services to guide you through all aspects of student finance step by step.

Click here to find information about fees, loans and support which will help to make the whole process a little easier to understand.

Undergraduate course applicants must apply via UCAS using the relevant UCAS code. The application fee is £12 for a single choice or £23 for more than one choice. For all applicants, there are full instructions at UCAS to make it as easy as possible for you to fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate.