BA (Hons) History

Overview

This course allows you to study History as a single honours degree, giving you an in-depth knowledge of the subject.

History is essential in understanding what the past means for us in the twenty-first century. Here at BGU, you won’t just study history through documents, you’ll learn through placements, site visits and the archives and museums that the ancient city of Lincoln has to offer.

Key Facts
Award: BA (Hons)
UCAS Code: V10A
Academic School: School of Humanities
Duration: 3 years
Mode of Study: Full-time
Start Date: September
Awarding Institution: Bishop Grosseteste University
Institution Code: B38
Why Study This Course?
BGU has an institutional specialism and focus on social and cultural history, making this different from most history degree courses.
What better place to study history than historic Lincoln? You will have thousands of years of history on your doorstep, ranging from Roman to Victorian, medieval to wartime and beyond.
This course offers fascinating and relevant visits, due to its long-established contacts with sites and locations across the region and beyond.
Concentrating on employability benefits this course develops your skills of analysis, evidencing, constructing arguments, writing and much more.
Entry Requirements

You will normally need 96 -112 UCAS tariff points (from a maximum of four Advanced Level qualifications). We welcome a range of qualifications that meet this requirement, such as A/AS Levels, BTEC, Access Courses, International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge Pre-U, Extended Project etc.

However this list is not exhaustive – please click here for details of all qualifications in the UCAS tariff.

Further Information

Click here for important information about this course including additional costs, resources and key policies.

In accordance with University conditions, students are entitled to apply for Accredited Prior Learning, AP(C)L, based on relevant credit at another HE institution or credit Awarded for Experiential Learning, (AP(E)L).

This course is subject to revalidation.

About The Course

History is essential in understanding what the past means for us in the twenty-first century. Here at BGU, you won’t just study history through documents, you’ll learn through placements, site visits and the archives and museums that the ancient city of Lincoln has to offer. Discover the ages in a dynamic and exciting way; through words, images, buildings and artefacts.

Throughout the course, you will discover a number of the modules which take a more thematic approach where you may explore critical issues such as community and public history, local history or war and commemoration. During your final year, with advice and guidance from academic staff, you will also choose to focus on a topic, period or theme that is of particular interest to you. This allows you to tailor the course to your own interests and particular career aspirations.

On this course, you will explore a range of fascinating topics spanning a number of historical eras, in a wide variety of local, national and global contexts. You’ll analyse data, construct arguments and engage in real historical research, along with looking at how history is encountered within the community. You’ll also take a work-based placement at an archive, museum or other historic sites.

This course will help to build your skills as a historian, from introductory subjects in your first year through to a research-based dissertation in your final year. As well as learning about people in the past, you will investigate how people today engage with history and consider how the past can be brought alive.

Welcome letter to all new 2019 students

Delivery

There is no one-size-fits-all method of teaching at BGU – we shape our methods to suit each subject and each group, combining the best aspects of traditional university teaching with innovative techniques to promote student participation and interactivity.

You will be taught in a variety of ways, from lectures, tutorials and seminars, to practical workshops, coursework, work-based placements or even field visits. Small group seminars and workshops will provide you with an opportunity to review issues raised in lectures, and you will be expected to carry out independent study.

Placements are a key part of degree study at BGU. They provide an enriching learning experience for you to apply the skills and knowledge you will gain from your course and, in doing so, give valuable real-world experience to boost your career.

Assessment

We recognise that individuals come from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, so we use a variety of assessment strategies on our courses.

In History, a variety of assessment methods are used, which include essays, reports, presentations and written tests. We support you in this work through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical workshops and a wide range of field visits. History is primarily a written subject and consequently, much of the assessment of the course is based on essays and reports. There are a few exams, which often include analysis of provided source material, either text or images. There are also a smaller number of oral presentations and the production of portfolios of research material.

Careers & Further Study

The study of history teaches you how to assemble and assess evidence from a wide range of sources – archival and digital, textual and visual. It teaches transferable skills in the analysis of data and the robust construction of arguments using critical reasoning supported by evidence.

Possible future careers for History graduates may include museums work, education and outreach work, publishing, law and public policy, information research and management, working as an archivist or librarian, or journalism. Successful graduates of this course have also continued to study for Masters degrees at BGU.

Year 1 Modules

This module provides a general history of British libraries, museums and archives from the collections of wealthy individuals in the early modern period to more middle and working-class collections and the ultimate establishment of state-supported national and public institutions from the mid-18th century to the present day. The establishment of the British Museum (and Library) in 1753 will act as a chronological focal point of the module as students will consider its historical significance and legacy.

Students taking this module engage in a survey approach to the history of interwar Britain. The module will consider various political, social, cultural and economic perspectives, as well as different interpretations in the historical literature. A particular focus will be the varied experiences of everyday life contrasting unemployment, poverty and depression with higher living standards and the growth of leisure activities.

This module will introduce you to the key events, themes and characters of the US Civil Rights Movement and Vietnam War. You will explore different elements of the Civil Rights Movement, including the black, women’s and gay rights movements, how these overlapped with the workers’ rights struggle and ultimately affected the national political landscape. This module will also enable you to appreciate the impact the war in Vietnam had on American society, culture and politics.

You will study aspects of the chronological account of the development of early modern Britain, and consider the period’s historical significance and legacy. The module will investigate various political, social, economic and cultural perspectives, and will include the study of prominent themes and events associated with the period.

During this module you will study aspects of the chronological account of the development of late medieval England and consider the period’s historical significance and legacy. The module will consider various political, social, cultural and economic perspectives, as well as different interpretations in the historical literature.

Through examining a variety of key theoretical texts and biographically-focused case studies, largely but not exclusively centred on British history, you will learn about different approaches to the history of identity and its utility for modern historical studies. At its core, the module will consist of a series of introductions to the principle sources for, and main theoretical approaches taken to, the study of a number of key identities within the disciplinary area of history such as, for example: sexuality, class, race, gender and disability.

This module serves as an introduction to the subject of history, offering a snapshot of some of the themes covered in subsequent modules. You will consider key areas of theory and practice in history, such as the significance of schools of historical thought, key source types and popular interpretative approaches.

Year 2 Modules

This module will encourage students to take the long view of the history of magic. The module will begin with a review of the complex relationship between religion, health, miracles and magic during the later medieval period. The subsequent development across early modern Europe of a culture of witchcraft persecution and prosecution will be considered through the lenses of fear, xenophobia and misogyny.

This module will develop students’ knowledge, understanding and subject-specific skills related to local and regional history. This will include relevant research methods, including archival study and digital information skills. The module will review the historiography associated with local and regional histories and students will consider a range of perspectives and framings such as the political, social, cultural and economic.

In this module students will study the development of western European society during the early medieval period. Students will be encouraged to critically review the evidence for social, cultural, urban and economic change during this period and consider the varied and contested interpretations placed upon such evidence.

This module provides you with an experience of the world of work in the form of a placement, work experience or a project with employer involvement. It enables you to apply knowledge and skills in a real-life context offering you a valuable experience to draw on when you present yourself to employers or selectors upon graduation. The module also reviews the nature of public history and in particular the relationship between heritage practitioners and popular history.

You will study aspects of the chronological development of the Atlantic during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The module will investigate various political, social, economic and cultural perspectives, and will include the study of prominent themes and events associated with the period.

The module will explore the historical evolution of modern British espionage throughout the twentieth century. It will include a critical discussion of the historiographical issues related to the study of intelligence history, focusing on a number of case studies drawn from: Britain’s culture of secrecy, the 1911 Official Secrets Act, the growth of MI5 and MI6, the Abdication Crisis of 1936, Ultra, the Cambridge Five, The Profumo Affair, the role of women, international relations, and the popular culture of espionage.

Year 3 Modules

This module will take students on a journey through the history of crime in Britain from 18th century highwaymen to 20th century gangsters, from the role of the parish constable through to a modern police force, and from transportation to the modern prison.

In this module, students are required to undertake a research-based project, drawing on academic advice as well as their own interests and intellectual skills, to produce a substantial written dissertation. Students conduct their research by addressing self-formulated questions, supported by the critical selection, evaluation and analysis of primary and secondary source material. By these means they devise and sustain a core argument, and/or solve relevant historical problems, to support the premise of their research question. The relatively modest guiding role of the supervisor means that students will be empowered to develop their intellectual and transferable skills of initiative and responsibility.

During this module, you will undertake a wide-ranging critical study of the political, social and cultural chronology of the Cold War from a number of differing geo-political perspectives including that of Great Britain and other European nations as well as the USA and USSR. The module will give significant focus to the conquest of Space as a specific element of both Cold War politics and later 20th century social and cultural change.

In this module you will study aspects of the chronological development of the British empire, its colonies and its decline across the long 19th century. The module will investigate various political, social, economic and cultural perspectives, and will give significant focus to the impact that British imperial policies had on other peoples and nations.

During this module, you will investigate a historical theme or topic by taking an in-depth, critical and complex approach at an advanced level. By way of example such Special Subjects might include: ‘The French Revolution: Liberty, terror, warfare and the origins of modernity’, ‘Vitals of the Commonwealth: Early Modern London’ or ‘The Secret War: Intelligence during the Second World War’.

Academic Staff
Support

Studying at BGU is a student-centred experience. Staff and students work together in a friendly and supportive atmosphere as part of an intimate campus community. You will know every member of staff personally and feel confident approaching them for help and advice, and staff members will recognise you, not just by sight, but as an individual with unique talents and interests. We will be there to support you, personally and academically, from induction to graduation.

Fees & Finance

A lot of student finance information is available from numerous sources, but it is sometimes confusing and contradictory. That’s why at BGU we try to give you all the information and support we can to help to throughout the process. Our Student Advice team are experts in helping you sort out the funding arrangements for your studies, offering a range of services to guide you through all aspects of student finance step by step. Click here to find information about fees, loans and support which will help to make the whole process a little easier to understand.

Undergraduate course applicants must apply via UCAS using the relevant UCAS code. The application fee is £12 for a single choice or £23 for more than one choice. For all applicants, there are full instructions at UCAS to make it as easy as possible for you to fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate.

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History Related Contents

Staff Profile

Dr Robert v. Friedeburg

Reader, History, School of Humanities Dr Robert von Friedeburg is Reader in History in the School of Humanities, focusing on......