BA (Hons) Applied Drama in the Community

Overview

This course allows you to study Applied Drama in the Community as a single honours degree, giving you an in-depth knowledge of the subject.

We have a passion for drama at BGU, and we want to share that passion with you. If you love drama and want to use it to make a difference in the wider world, then you’ll find that our Applied Drama courses, which mix the academic and the creative, will offer you the opportunity to put your love of drama to practical use.

Key Facts
Award: BA (Hons)
UCAS Code: W400
Academic School: School of Humanities
Duration: 3 years
Mode of Study: Full-time
Start Date: September
Awarding Institution: Bishop Grosseteste University
Institution Code: B38
Entry Requirements

You will normally need 96 -112 UCAS tariff points (from a maximum of four Advanced Level qualifications). We welcome a range of qualifications that meet this requirement, such as A/AS Levels, BTEC, Access Courses, International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge Pre-U, Extended Project etc.

However this list is not exhaustive – please click here for details of all qualifications in the UCAS tariff.

Further Information

Click here for important information about this course including additional costs, resources and key policies.

About The Course

Applied Drama at BGU is for you if you are lively, curious and interested in making a difference to others. It’s ideal if you want to take your projects into the community, such as into special needs and mental health settings, care homes, schools, nurseries, youth groups and many more – whilst all the time improving your performance skills, communication skills and knowledge of the subject.

We encourage our students to express individuality, connect with local communities and demonstrate what they have to offer. You’ll learn how to assess community needs, use your energy and imagination to respond accordingly, devise workshops and performance work, and learn organisational, fundraising and event management skills at the same time. In addition to the academic study of drama and theatre, you will find yourself working in a lively atmosphere with like-minded people on interesting projects. Many of these projects are taken into schools and other community settings, such as youth groups, special needs units and care units, making drama work for individuals, community groups and society as a whole. You’ll have the opportunity to work collaboratively in groups, acting, directing and studying theatre.

In addition to our full-time and part time staff, we bring in specialist practitioners to all our drama degree programmes. This means that we can offer an up-to-date and relevant professional perspective. Our specialist practitioners offer students the chance to work alongside professional companies and take part in local and national festivals. Elements of enterprise and problem-solving, which are invaluable assets in the employment market, are central to our drama courses. As well as performance skills, you’ll develop good communication skills, confidence and resourcefulness.

At all stages of the course, you will practise what you learn through practical study and live projects. Extended placements make this a unique course, tailored perfectly for you. We encourage individuality and are genuinely interested in your ideas and what you have to offer.

Delivery

There is no one-size-fits-all method of teaching at BGU – we shape our methods to suit each subject and each group, combining the best aspects of traditional university teaching with innovative techniques to promote student participation and interactivity.

You will be taught in a variety of ways, from lectures, tutorials and seminars, to practical workshops, coursework, work-based placements or even field visits. Small group seminars and workshops will provide you with an opportunity to review issues raised in lectures, and you will be expected to carry out independent study.

Placements are a key part of degree study at BGU. They provide an enriching learning experience for you to apply the skills and knowledge you will gain from your course and, in doing so, give valuable real-world experience to boost your career.

Assessment

We recognise that individuals come from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, so we use a variety of assessment strategies on our courses.

We use a versatile range of assessments in Drama which reflect both the equal emphasis we place on theory and practice, and the importance we give to the future employment skills of our graduates. Theory based assessment methods include analytical reports, student-led seminars, presentations, essays, dissertations, exhibitions of work and portfolios. More practical assessment methods may include analysed performances, group presentations, practical performances or large scale individual community placements.

Year 1 Modules
During the course of this module there will be an analysis of key contemporary community art practitioners/theories and how to relate these to the needs of the community. You will engage in the exploration of key contemporary community art practitioners/theories in relation to the function of the arts, with specific emphasis on dance and musicianship.
This module will take a European perspective of theatre history in a social context. A representative selection of eras from the following list; Greek, medieval, Elizabethan, Restoration, Commedia dell‘Arte, Melodrama, pantomime and Naturalism will be selected and exemplar texts from each of the eras will be explored.
This module is built around the principal approaches to Stanislavski’s acting techniques to the creation and realisation of a character and performance. All sessions will focus on equipping you with the basic skills required to engage in acting through a series of structured exercises, games and workshops, and specific directed tasks.
You will consider the historical and theoretical roots of Applied Drama and work through some of its forms. Sessions will look at a selection of Applied Drama strands such as Theatre for Development, Prison Theatre, Theatre and Disability, Theatre and Welfare, Reminiscence Theatre, Therapeutic Drama, Process Drama and others to explore theory and practice across the discipline.
This module will act as a foundation for the rest of the course and will ensure that you have a common core understanding of essential critical and practical skills. The module will reference the work of a selection of theatre practitioners and theatre styles such as Stanislavski, Artaud, Grotowski.
During the course of this module you will explore key contemporary theories relating to the functions of fact based theatre, including the work of Douglas Murray and Littlewood and work of many verbatim theatre makers such as Richard Norton-Taylor, Gillian Slovo, Moises Kauffman, Alana Valentine. The historical origins and nature of verbatim and documentary will be considered in addition to theatre design, convention and the staging of plays.
The module will explore key contemporary theories relating to the functions of narrative including the work of Zipes, Warner and Wilson. The origins and nature of drama, including ritual and narrative, will be considered in addition to the resurgence of public storytelling in current society.
During the course of this module you will focus on a broad range of skills required in order to function academically. This will include essay writing, presentation of work using technology, debating academically, and how to do a literature review manually and through digital media.
Year 2 Modules
This module puts an emphasis on the political effect – both radical and conservative – of popular theatre forms, considering them in shifting contexts of nationalism, multiculturalism, citizenship and globalisation. The module will begin with a consideration of a variety of popular theatrical traditions such as carnival, street performance and spectacle, pantomime, children’s theatre, stand-up comedy, circus skills and others to connect these popular theatre forms to questions of identity and civic participation.
This module is centred on theatre as a tool for social change through the use of participatory techniques. It is designed to equip you with the necessary skills to enable you to employ those techniques to facilitate positive effect within a community context.
This module provides you with an experience of the world of work in the form of a placement or work experience or a project with employer involvement. It enables you to apply knowledge and skills in a real-life context offering you a valuable experience to draw on when you present yourself to employers or selectors upon graduation.
The purpose of this module is to allow you to gain detailed insights into the world of the playwright, their intentions and influences. You will implicitly consider how one’s social class, context and gender influence performance work, and investigate form, structure and meaning.
The module will work on Shakespearian text with a particular emphasis on the relevance of Shakespeare’s work to a contemporary audience and its role within the National Curriculum. The whole process of staging a production will be investigated in detail, from script preparation and directing styles to set, costumes and administration.
This module will allow you to extend your theoretical knowledge of the field and to enhance the understanding of workshop techniques in relation to Applied Theatre. The history and political and social background of Theatre in Education will be studied and the challenges of interventionalist theatre will be explored in some detail.
Year 3 Modules
During the course of this module you will be equipped to identify an area that interests you regarding your research project on a topic of your own choosing, with support from a supervisor and/or personal tutor, plenary teaching and online learning resources. Lectures will consider issues of research design and the creation of research questions, qualitative and quantitative methodologies, data gathering (and the ethics of data collection) and analysis.
This module builds on the foundation of everything you will have learnt over the three years of the course and it is your opportunity to meld theory with practice in your own specific undertaking. You will be tasked with facilitating a relevant and appropriate event which reflects the needs of the community group in a challenging yet supportive framework.
During the course of this module there will be a significant amount of group discussion and exploration about ethics, health and safety, methods of negotiation and a recap of workshop skills. Discussion will take place about safeguarding, disclosure and the need for lines communication with host community groups.
This module will include study of the major practitioners in educational drama during the past thirty years, and emerging drama teaching philosophy. Detailed consideration will be given to the place of signing, symbol and metaxis in drama teaching and the subtleties of working alongside young people in developing process drama will be practiced in the studio.
You will engage in an examination of appropriate planning for theatrical events and consideration of possible rehearsal techniques. Design concepts within a working context, and the style and form of the production will be considered with reference to theories introduced in other modules.
Academic Staff
Dr Dennis Eluyefa
Academic Staff

Dr Dennis Eluyefa is a Senior Lecturer in Drama in the School of Humanities. He studied at Obafemi Awolowo

Support

Studying at BGU is a student-centred experience. Staff and students work together in a friendly and supportive atmosphere as part of an intimate campus community. You will know every member of staff personally and feel confident approaching them for help and advice, and staff members will recognise you, not just by sight, but as an individual with unique talents and interests. We will be there to support you, personally and academically, from induction to graduation.

Fees & Finance

A lot of student finance information is available from numerous sources, but it is sometimes confusing and contradictory. That’s why at BGU we try to give you all the information and support we can to help to throughout the process. Our Student Advice team are experts in helping you sort out the funding arrangements for your studies, offering a range of services to guide you through all aspects of student finance step by step. Click here to find information about fees, loans and support which will help to make the whole process a little easier to understand.

Undergraduate course applicants must apply via UCAS using the relevant UCAS code. The application fee is £12 for a single choice or £23 for more than one choice. For all applicants, there are full instructions at UCAS to make it as easy as possible for you to fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate.

Drama Related Area

All
About BGU
About Lincoln
Academic Partners
Accessibility
Accommodation
Adjustment
Admissions
Alumni
and any other tag
Anglican
Apply
Apprenticeships
Archaeology
Archaeology Lecture
Art
Assessment Only Route to QTS (Primary and Secondary)
Bar
Bar BG
Bed and breakfast
Beyond ITE
BG Conference & Events
BG Futures
BG Generations
BG Talk
BG&You
BGCOSA
BGSU
BGU Foundation Fund
BGU Say
BGUSU
Bursaries
Bursary
Business
business inspiration
Business skills Support
Business TE
Campus
campus related news
Careers
Careers and Employability
Catering
CEET
CELT
Certificate in Education
Chancellor
Chapel
Chaplain
Chaplaincy
Christmas
Church
Church of England
Cinema
Clearing
Coaching
CofE
Coffee
Community & Partnerships
Community Music
Constance Stewart
Contact
Continuing Professional Development
Cornerstone
Councelling
Counselling
CPD
Crosstrend
Curiositea
Curiosity
Dance
DBS
Digital Learning
disability
Disabled
Diversity
Doctoral Study
Doctorate
Doctors
Drama
Drinking
Dyscalculia
Dyslexia
Early Childhood Studies
Eating
EdD
Education
Emotional and Mental Health Conference
Employability
Employment
English
Enrolment
Equivalents
ERASMUS
Events
Faith
FdA
Fees
Finance
Find us
Fitness
Food
For Business and Employers
Forms
Foundation
Freedom of Information
Funding
Fundraising
Futures
Generations
Geography
Governance
Graduate
Graduate Attributes
Graduating
Graduation
Grant
Grants
Gym
Halls
Halls of residence
Health
History
Honorary Awards
HR
Induction
International
IT Services
Jobs
Learning and teaching
Learning Development
Library
LincHigher
Lincoln
Linguistics
Living
Loans
Longdales
Longdales House
LORIC
Masters
Mathematics
Matriculation
Mature students
Mentor Training
Military History
Money
MSc in Wellbeing in Learning and Teaching
NA-SENCO
News
Ofsted
Open Days
OSA
Our city
Outreach
Partnership in ITE
Partnerships
People and Organisational Development
PGCE
PGDE
PhD
Physical Education
Physics
Policies
Postgraduate
Pre-Teaching
Primary
Primary and Community Care
Procedures
Professional Studies
Progression Routes
Prospectus
Psychology
QTS
Rasen Lane
Refectory
Regulations
Research
Residence
Sandford
Sandford Award
Scholarship
Scholarships
School Direct
Semester Dates
seni
Short Courses
SKE
Social
Social & Cultural History
Social Care
Social Emotional and Mental Health Conference
Societies
Sociology
Special Educational Needs
Special Educational Needs & Disability
Sport
Sport & Fitness Centre
Sport centre
Sports
Sports centre
Staff
Student Admin
Student Advice
Student Ambassadors
Student engagement
Student Life
Student loan
Student loans
Student support
Students' union
Studentships
Study
SU
Summer school
Symposium
Taster days
Teaching
Teenage Market
TEF
TESOL
The city
The Venue
Theatre
Theology & Ethics
Theology & Religious Studies
Training and Skills
Tuition
Tuition fees
Undergraduate
Union
University Council
Venue
Vice Chancellor
Vision
Volunteering
What's on
Whats on
Wickham
Widening Participation

Drama Related Contents

No post was found with your current grid settings. You should verify if you have posts inside the current selected post type(s) and if the meta key filter is not too much restrictive.