BA (Hons) Archaeology and History

Overview

This course allows you to jointly study Archaeology & History, giving you a fully rounded experience of both subjects.

Studying Archaeology is ideal if you’re fascinated by both the ancient and more recent past and if you want to explore and investigate the material remains of previous societies and cultures. It will allow you to get hands-on with the past and explore civilizations and people from throughout history, in a practical and interesting way.

History is essential in understanding what the past means for us in the twenty-first century. Here at BGU, you won’t just study history through documents, you’ll learn through placements, site visits and the archives and museums that the ancient city of Lincoln has to offer.

Key Facts
Award: BA (Hons)
UCAS Code: V758
Academic School: School of Humanities
Duration: 3 years
Mode of Study: Full-time
Start Date: September
Awarding Institution: Bishop Grosseteste University
Institution Code: B38
Entry Requirements

You will normally need 96 -112 UCAS tariff points (from a maximum of four Advanced Level qualifications). We welcome a range of qualifications that meet this requirement, such as A/AS Levels, BTEC, Access Courses, International Baccalaureate (IB), Cambridge Pre-U, Extended Project etc.

However this list is not exhaustive – please click here for details of all qualifications in the UCAS tariff.

Further Information

Click here for important information about this course including additional costs, resources and key policies.

About The Course
Archaeology

Lincoln is the perfect city in which to study Archaeology. With a 2,000 year history, from Roman foundations to industrial renaissance, you’ll be in the ideal position to discover both ancient and modern here at BGU. So, are you ready to take an amazing journey into the physical reality of the past? Do you have an urge to explore and investigate material remains? Do you want the chance to get hands-on with history? We thought so…

Throughout the course, you will have the chance to study material from prehistory through to Roman and Medieval times as well as exploring contemporary archaeology. In addition to studying archaeological evidence from these different periods, you will also explore key ideas and current issues, such as archaeological method and theory, landscape archaeology and community archaeology.

Not only will you gain the practical skills to undertake archaeological fieldwork, including excavation, surveying, and post-excavation studies, you’ll also strengthen key transferable skills, such as analysing data, assessing evidence, presenting your views and constructing arguments using critical reasoning.

Employability is important to us at BGU, and as part of the course you will have the chance to take a work-based placement at a relevant commercial unit, heritage practice or museum, as well as the exciting opportunity to join the annual BGU training and research excavation – where you can put into practice your newly developed skills.

History

History is essential in understanding what the past means for us in the twenty-first century. Here at BGU, you won’t just study history through documents, you’ll learn through placements, site visits and the archives and museums that the ancient city of Lincoln has to offer. Discover the ages in a dynamic and exciting way; through words, images, buildings and artefacts.

Throughout the course, you will discover a number of the modules which take a more thematic approach where you may explore critical issues such as community and public history, local history or war and commemoration. During your final year, with advice and guidance from academic staff, you will also choose to focus on a topic, period or theme that is of particular interest to you. This allows you to tailor the course to your own interests and particular career aspirations.

On this course, you will explore a range of fascinating topics spanning a number of historical eras, in a wide variety of local, national and global contexts. You’ll analyse data, construct arguments and engage in real historical research, along with looking at how history is encountered within the community. You’ll also take a work-based placement at an archive, museum or other historic sites.

This course will help to build your skills as a historian, from introductory subjects in your first year through to a research-based dissertation in your final year. As well as learning about people in the past, you will investigate how people today engage with history and consider how the past can be brought alive.

Delivery

There is no one-size-fits-all method of teaching at BGU – we shape our methods to suit each subject and each group, combining the best aspects of traditional university teaching with innovative techniques to promote student participation and interactivity.

You will be taught in a variety of ways, from lectures, tutorials and seminars, to practical workshops, coursework, work-based placements or even field visits. Small group seminars and workshops will provide you with an opportunity to review issues raised in lectures, and you will be expected to carry out independent study.

Placements are a key part of degree study at BGU. They provide an enriching learning experience for you to apply the skills and knowledge you will gain from your course and, in doing so, give valuable real-world experience to boost your career.

Assessment

We recognise that individuals come from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, so we use a variety of assessment strategies on our courses.

In Archaeology, assessment is carried out using wide-range of approaches, including written assignments, coursework, essays and reports. There are a few exams throughout the course but these often include analysis of provided source material, either text or images. You will also carry out a small number of oral presentations, produce portfolios of research material, and undertake some practical assessments.

In History, a variety of assessment methods are used, which include essays, reports, presentations and written tests. We support you in this work through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical workshops and a wide range of field visits. History is primarily a written subject and consequently, much of the assessment of the course is based on essays and reports. There are a few exams, which often include analysis of provided source material, either text or images. There are also a smaller number of oral presentations and the production of portfolios of research material.

Careers & Further Study

As well as learning a number of highly practical skills, Archaeology also teaches you how to assemble and assess evidence, analyse data and present and defend your views – all of which are highly sought-after by employers upon graduation. Possible future careers for Archaeology graduates may include Commercial Archaeologist, Heritage Consultant, Archivist, Researcher, Museum education and outreach, or Editorial work or journalism.

Combining your study with History opens up a variety of other career possibilities.

The study of history teaches you how to assemble and assess evidence from a wide range of sources – archival and digital, textual and visual. It teaches transferable skills in the analysis of data and the robust construction of arguments using critical reasoning supported by evidence.

Possible future careers for History graduates may include museums work, education and outreach work, publishing, law and public policy, information research and management, working as an archivist or librarian, or journalism. Successful graduates of this course have also continued to study for Masters degrees at BGU.

Year 1 Modules
This module will allow you to consider key areas of theory and practice, such as: The origins and character of archaeology as an academic discipline, the approaches taken to data gathering and analysis by archaeologists, and the relationship between theory and interpretation. You will be introduced to a number of core practical skills required of archaeologists in both field and laboratory settings.
This module will investigate evidence for social, economic and cultural life, and will include the study of significant sites, themes and events, associated with the period. You will typically cover topics such as prehistoric social structures and economy, prehistoric and Roman funerary practices, military aspects of the Roman conquest and the end of imperial rule in Britain.
During this module you will study aspects of the chronological account of the development of late medieval England and consider the period’s historical significance and legacy. The module will consider various political, social, cultural and economic perspectives, as well as different interpretations in the historical literature.
You will study aspects of the chronological account of the development of early modern Britain, and consider the period’s historical significance and legacy. The module will investigate various political, social, economic and cultural perspectives, and will include the study of prominent themes and events associated with the period.
This module serves as an introduction to the subject of history, offering a snapshot of some of the themes covered in subsequent modules. You will consider key areas of theory and practice covered in subsequent modules in history, such as the significance of schools of historical thought, key source types and popular interpretative approaches.
Year 2 Modules
You will study aspects of the archaeology of medieval Europe, and through comparative study understand Britain’s archaeology within this context. You will investigate the evidence for European political and social structures, economic and cultural networks, and include the study of the archaeological evidence for everyday life and the rituals of death.
You will study aspects of the chronological development of the Atlantic during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The module will investigate various political, social, economic and cultural perspectives, and will include the study of prominent themes and events associated with the period.
This module will investigate a range of interdisciplinary approaches and materials. The content will include relevant and topical themes that encourage and enrich interdisciplinary approaches, for example: ‘War and Commemoration’, 'Culture, Ethnicity and Identity', ‘The Country and the City’, ‘Revolution and Reaction’; and ‘Belief and Blasphemy’.
This module will allow you to explore various forms of historical sources available to the historian investigating communities and families in the past, including: visual, oral and textual; tangible and intangible; and official and private. This will be undertaken through visits to local archive offices and other sites, and the use of electronic repositories.
You will study and experience aspects of the identification, recording, excavation and post-excavation of archaeological evidence through a live excavation project. You will gain a thorough practical knowledge of the methods and techniques used by archaeologists to survey, record and excavate archaeological features.
In this module, you will study the inter-relationship between the contemporary world and the archaeological evidence for the past, including aspects of the identification, recording, management and interpretation of archaeology in both national and international contexts. This includes a consideration of archaeological project management and, more specifically, investigative/excavation strategy and decision making.
Year 3 Modules
During this module, you will undertake a wide-ranging critical study of the political, social and cultural chronology of the Cold War from a number of differing geo-political perspectives including that of Great Britain and other European nations. The module will give significant focus to the conquest of Space as a specific element of Cold War politics.
This module requires you to devise and undertake a substantial research-based dissertation on a subject of interest to yourself, and to prepare in written form an abstract and working bibliography. You will conduct your research through self-formulated questions, supported by the acquisition of appropriate archaeological data and construct complex and sophisticated arguments to support the premise of your research question.
You will study aspects of the chronological development of the British empire, its colonies and its decline across the long 19th century. The module will investigate various political, social, economic and cultural perspectives, and will give significant focus to the impact that British imperial policies had on other peoples and nations.
This independent study module is an opportunity for you to explore selected themes and issues in the thinking and practice in history. The module will build on areas of knowledge, application and interest gained in preceding modules in the programme.
During this module you will undertake a wide-ranging critical study of the disciplinary area of conflict archaeology, with specific case studies taken from a number of differing chronological and geographical contexts. Consideration will be given to the methodologies of practice, analysis and interpretation that characterise this archaeological sub-discipline, from fieldwork through standing building recording, to critical artefact studies.
This independent study project module is an opportunity for you to explore selected themes and issues in the thinking and practice in archaeology. Initial discussion and advice will help you in the selection of an archaeological theme or topic for your study.
This module provides a critical approach to the study of archaeological artefacts from both an applied and theoretical perspective. You will make use of a variety of artefacts and assemblages, both excavated finds and from reference collections, to engage in laboratory-based processes of analysis and conservation.
Academic Staff
Dr Craig Spence
Programme leader

Craig is a Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader for History. His academic career commenced with advanced re

Dr Duncan Wright
Programme leader

Duncan is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology, specialising in interdisciplinary studies of settlement, landscap

Dr Robert v. Friedeburg
Academic Staff

Dr Robert von Friedeburg is Reader in History in the School of Humanities, focusing on early modern and mod

Support

Studying at BGU is a student-centred experience. Staff and students work together in a friendly and supportive atmosphere as part of an intimate campus community. You will know every member of staff personally and feel confident approaching them for help and advice, and staff members will recognise you, not just by sight, but as an individual with unique talents and interests. We will be there to support you, personally and academically, from induction to graduation.

Fees & Finance

A lot of student finance information is available from numerous sources, but it is sometimes confusing and contradictory. That’s why at BGU we try to give you all the information and support we can to help to throughout the process. Our Student Advice team are experts in helping you sort out the funding arrangements for your studies, offering a range of services to guide you through all aspects of student finance step by step. Click here to find information about fees, loans and support which will help to make the whole process a little easier to understand.

Undergraduate course applicants must apply via UCAS using the relevant UCAS code. The application fee is £12 for a single choice or £23 for more than one choice. For all applicants, there are full instructions at UCAS to make it as easy as possible for you to fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate.

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Archaeology Related Contents

Staff Profile

Dr Duncan Wright

Senior Lecturer in Archaeology Duncan is Senior Lecturer in Archaeology, specialising in interdisciplinary studies of...